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August 11, 2016 9:44 am

Lead Nazi Investigator in Germany Identifies Eight New Suspects

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Jens Rommel said information about the suspects have been submitted to prosecutors across Germany. Photo: Germany's Central Office for the Investigation of Nazi Crimes in Ludwigsburg.

Jens Rommel said information about the suspects have been submitted to prosecutors across Germany. Photo: Germany’s Central Office for the Investigation of Nazi Crimes in Ludwigsburg.

JNS.org – Germany’s lead Nazi crimes investigator has identified eight people who are suspected of working at concentration camps in Poland during the Holocaust.

The head of Germany’s Central Office for the Investigation of Nazi Crimes in Ludwigsburg, Jens Rommel, told German news agency DPA that information about the eight elderly suspects, four men and four women, has been submitted to prosecutors across Germany, who are currently investigating the suspects for working at the Stutthoff concentration camp near the Baltic coast in Poland.

Rommel’s agency does not itself prosecute Nazis, but has been given another decade by the German government to continue searching for potential living suspects who could still be prosecuted for their Nazi pasts. In 2011, the conviction of Sobibor death camp guard John Demjanjuk was the first conviction based on the agency’s investigation of a suspect for his involvement in a death camp without proof of a specific crime.

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“Germany’s commitment to identifying more former Nazi camp guards is encouraging,” Ronald Lauder, president of the World Jewish Congress, said in a statement.

“Given the vast system of concentration and extermination camps put in place by the Nazis, and the amount of personnel required to run and guard these sites, it comes as no surprise that some of these perpetrators are still alive, even today,” he said, Reuters reported.

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