Thursday, November 26th | 10 Kislev 5781

Subscribe
July 2, 2018 10:34 am

Rare Coin Minted 1,900 Years Ago Discovered in ‎Jerusalem

avatar by Israel Hayom / JNS.org

A rare coin minted 1,949 years ago was found last ‎week ‎in a dig in the City of ‎David in ‎Jerusalem.‎ Photo: courtesy of City of David.

JNS.org – A rare coin minted 1,949 years ago was found last ‎week ‎in a dig in the City of ‎David in ‎Jerusalem.‎

Reut Vilf of the ‎City of David Foundation said the ‎coin, discovered ‎in the sewage system ‎running ‎beneath ancient ‎Jerusalem, dates back to the year 69 ‎C.E. — the fourth year ‎of the Jewish revolt against ‎Rome and the year in ‎which the rebels despaired.‎

According to Israeli media reports, a cache of ‎bronze coins from that time was found in 2014 in a ‎village near Jerusalem, and more were unearthed in a ‎cave by the Temple Mount in 2018, from the second and ‎fourth years of the rebellion.‎

The coin found last week bears an inscription in ‎ancient Hebrew lettering reading “For the Redemption ‎of Zion” and a depiction of a chalice. ‎

Related coverage

November 25, 2020 3:54 pm
0

‘Economic Relations With UAE Will Be Developed 10 Times Faster Than With Other Countries,’ Says Israeli Tech CEO

CTech - “In the United Arab Emirates, many have understood that while oil is a good thing, it’s not something...

Its other side features the Four Species used in ‎the Sukkot holiday — the citron fruit, palm frond, and myrtle and willow branches — and the words “Year Four,” ‎referring to the final year of rebellion against the ‎Romans.‎

‎”The coin was found exactly in the same place that ‎Jews had been hiding in the drainage channel under ‎the street,” Vilf noted. Evidence of the rebels’ ‎attempt to hide under the city includes intact oil ‎lamps and ceramic pots that were found whole in the ‎sewer itself.‎

Interpreting the inscription on the coin, she said, ‎‎”Freedom is an immediate thing, while redemption is ‎a process. It could attest to their understanding ‎that the end was near.”‎

Eli Shukron, an archaeologist with the Israel ‎Antiquities Authority, said that in all likelihood, ‎the coin could have fallen into the drainage system ‎through cracks of the stone-paved road.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner

Algemeiner.com

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.