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November 19, 2018 10:12 am

Friday’s Gaza Fence Protests Were Aimed at Gulf Arab States, Not Israel

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A Palestinian rioter on the Israel-Gaza Strip border, Oct. 26, 2018. Photo: Reuters / Mohammed Salem.

Every week, the riots at the Gaza fence have a theme. In the Spring, the theme was the “right to return,” but then the weekly themes branched out into other areas, like honoring Palestinian workers and the Palestinian flag, or commemorating the 1967 war.

Last week, the theme wasn’t aimed at boosting the morale of Gazans or demonizing Israel, but protesting Arab states that “normalize” relations with Israel.

The title of the riots was, “Normalization with the enemy is a crime and betrayal.” 

Organizers of the march — meaning Hamas — issued a statement saying that they “condemn all steps and projects towards normalization with the occupation,” calling on the people of the Arab and Islamic nation to “confront normalization.”

Other officials from Gaza factions issued statements against “normalization” as well.

It is notable that the so-called “peace camp” in both Israel and the US have been all but silent on the incredible recent meeting between Netanyahu and the Sultan of Oman, as well as invitations to Israeli officials to attend meetings in Bahrain and the UAE.

Perhaps they agree with Hamas that peace and “normalization” are a terrible idea. Or maybe that’s just because the “most right-wing government in Israel’s history” is the one that has been successful in moving towards those goals.

Elder of Ziyon has been blogging about Israel and the Arab world for a really long time now. He also controls the world, but deep down you already knew that.

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