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December 30, 2018 2:22 pm

Latest Polls Show Big Win for Netanyahu, Contradictory Results for ‘New Right,’ Smaller Parties

avatar by Benjamin Kerstein

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Israeli Education Minister Naftali Bennett (R) and Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, from the Jewish Home party, deliver statements in Tel Aviv, Israel December 29, 2018. Photo: REUTERS/Corinna Kern.

One day after Education Minister Naftali Bennett and Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked shook up Israeli politics by splitting from their Jewish Home party to form the “New Right” party, two new polls show very different public responses to the surprise move.

A survey by the Hebrew news site Walla shows Bennett and Shaked’s party coming in fifth with ten seats, while their former party Jewish Home would collapse, gaining only four seats compared to its current eight.

Another poll, however, conducted by Israel’s Hadashot news, showed divergent results, indicating that Jewish Home without Bennett and Shaked would take eight seats, while their New Right party would take only six.

Both polls indicated a big win for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his Likud party, showing Likud comfortably in first place with 28 seats. The Walla poll showed Yair Lapid’s Yesh Atid party in second place with 15 seats while the Hadashot poll predicted Yesh Atid would take 12.

The Walla poll also showed an erosion in support for former IDF chief of staff Benny Gantz’s Hosen LeYisrael party, which had previously been running in the teens. According to Walla’s numbers, it would take only 11 seats, coming in fourth. The Hadashot poll, however, shows Gantz’s party in second place with 14 seats.

Rounding out the top five, according to Walla, is the Joint List, a coalition of Arab nationalist and leftist parties, which would come in third at 13 seats.

Both polls forecast a disaster for the center-left Zionist Union party, which would drop to sixth place with only nine seats as opposed to its current 24.

 

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