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June 6, 2019 8:35 am

Anti-Israel Hate Marches Continue in Europe and the West

avatar by Laureen Lipsky

Opinion

An Israeli flag is burned by protestors at the 2019 “Quds Day” demonstration in Tehran. Photo: Reuters/Meghdad Madali.

Last weekend, antisemitic rallies protected by free speech rights were once again tolerated by Western and European countries. Isn’t it interesting that so many hate marches target the Jewish people?

Starting in 1979, Iran has been the sponsor of Al-Quds (the Arabic name for Jerusalem) marches, coinciding with the last day of Ramadan. The purpose of the marches is to express solidarity with the Palestinian people.

The participants at these Jew-hate gatherings claim to only stand against the evil “Zionist regime” — but just like Hamas and Hezbollah, many of them shout about killing Jews.

Western Europe, of all places, should be ashamed of these antisemitic rallies, considering that antisemitism is currently at alarmingly high levels there (partly driven by an influx of Muslim migrants). Germany, for example, has finally admitted to its elevated rise of Muslim-initiated crimes against Jews.

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In my view, German leader Angela Merkel should outlaw Al-Quds rallies. But I believe that she wants to cater to the growing Muslim population, even though she talks about free speech as a reason for allowing the events. In a country where, less than 100 years ago, the Nazi party rose to power and orchestrated the largest genocide in modern history, the Al-Quds demonstrations are an embarrassment for Germany. Expressions heard at these marches — such as “send Jews to the ovens,” “Hitler didn’t finish the job,” and “kill the Jews” — are very much in line with Nazi ideology.

Until this year, Hezbollah flags were on full display in London’s Al-Quds march. While they may be gone, the “Palestine” flag is still on display. This flag represents suicide bombings, stabbings, rocket barrages, and shootings against Jews. One sheikh spoke from the podium at the march, and declared that the “resistance” would only accept President Trump’s soon-to-be proposed peace deal if the “Zionists” leave.

Thousands of people in London were shouting that Israel is a “terrorist” state and that Palestine from the river to the sea will be free — which means they want to destroy Israel. That is a call for terrorism. And it wasn’t just Muslims who were in attendance; it was antisemites and anti-Zionists on the left and the right.

The Community Security Trust, a group monitoring antisemitism in the UK, recently shared that 2019 is set to be the third year in a row with increased antisemitic incidents; there were a reported 1,652 cases in 2018.

These hate marches also occurred in North America. Last Friday, Times Square in New York City was rife with antisemitism as a multitude of groups called for the destruction of Israel.

Recently, the Times Square Alliance did not allow a billboard against Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (D-MN), but these anti-Israel hate gatherings are acceptable. New York City has seen a huge increase in antisemitic attacks, largely carried out against religious Jews in Brooklyn. Most of these incidents are ignored by the media.

Toronto, another hotbed of rising antisemitism, similarly featured a rally with lie-filled signs and terrorist propaganda against the only Jewish state.

If Western societies wish to effectively curb antisemitism, these Al-Quds marches have to end. No real Jew would feel safe walking by such vicious hate.

Laureen Lipsky is a pro-Israel advocate living in New York and the founder of Taking Back the Narrative.

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