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June 3, 2020 11:06 am

Czech Jewish Community Highlights Major Increase in Online Antisemitism in New Report

avatar by Algemeiner Staff

Tombstones are seen at the Old Jewish Cemetery in Prague, Czech Republic, April 20, 2020. Photo: Reuters / David W Cerny.

Antisemitic incidents doubled in the Czech Republic in 2019, a new report by the country’s Federation of Jewish Communities (FZO) disclosed on Wednesday.

None of the 694 incidents involved physical violence, however, with 95 percent of them occurring on the internet.

An additional nine incidents involved verbal insults or the destruction of property — including the vandalism in June 2019 of a monument in Prague to Sir Nicholas Winton, a British citizen who saved hundreds of Czech Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis.

The online material targeting Jews included “theories about the global Jewish conspiracy, about the power and influence that Jews use to control the world, the media and all important socio-economic processes, including migration flows,” the FZO report noted.

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Antisemitism was visible in both its far-right and anti-Zionist forms, according to the report, especially on “the websites of extreme right-wing entities and in the speeches of activists supporting the BDS movement.”

More than 15 percent of the incidents recorded involved standard anti-Zionist tropes, such as comparing Israel to Nazi Germany and denial of the Jewish state’s right to exist.

The FZO emphasized nonetheless that the Czech Republic remained a safe country for the Jewish community, especially in comparison with other countries in central and western Europe.

Approximately 4,000 Jews live in the Czech Republic, mainly in the capital, Prague.

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