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July 26, 2018 1:12 pm

Syrian Flag Raised in Quneitra, on Syrian Side of Golan Heights

avatar by Reuters and Algemeiner Staff

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Uniformed men chat next to Syrian and Ba’ath Party flags in Quneitra, on the Syrian side of the border with Israel in the Golan Heights, as seen from the Israeli side, July 26, 2018. Photo: Reuters / Ammar Awad.

Pro-Assad forces raised the Syrian flag in Quneitra on Thursday, as the government continued its push to regain full control of the Syrian side of the Golan Heights, a strategic area that borders Israel and Jordan.

A Reuters photographer saw uniformed men raise the Syrian national flag and the black, white, green and red flag of the Baath Party in the long-abandoned city. No weapons were immediately visible.

The Reuters photographer was reporting from a vantage point on the Israeli side of the Golan Heights that overlooks Quneitra.

Forces supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, backed by a Russian air campaign, have been pushing into Quneitra province following an offensive last month that routed rebels in adjoining Deraa province who were once backed by Washington, Jordan and Gulf states.

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Damascus is set to recover control of the Golan area in a major victory over rebels, who have agreed to surrender terms. The army is still battling a local Islamic State affiliate around the Yarmouk Basin nearby.

Israel says it is concerned that Assad may defy a 1974 UN armistice that demilitarized much of the Golan, or let his Iranian and Lebanese Hezbollah reinforcements deploy there. Israel captured its side of the Golan from Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War.

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