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June 26, 2019 4:12 pm

Argentine Foreign Minister Reiterates Justice Call for Victims of 1994 AMIA Jewish Center Bombing

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A display in Buenos Aires of pictures and names of victims of the 1994 AMIA bombing, in which 85 people died and hundreds more were wounded. Photo: Reuters / Marcos Brindicci.

Argentina’s foreign minister has reiterated his country’s determination to bring to trial the Iranian-backed terrorists responsible for the July 1994 bombing of the AMIA Jewish center in Buenos Aires — the worst terror atrocity in the country’s history, in which 85 people were killed and over 300 wounded.

“We do not cease in our demand for justice, or our request that the accused appear before Argentine justice,” Argentine Foreign Minister Jorge Faurie told a gathering at the United Nations in New York this week to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the AMIA atrocity.

Faurie said that the AMIA bombing — carried out by Iranian and Hezbollah operatives — “was not only an attack against the Jewish community, but against all Argentines and the democracy of our country.”

He added that his government was committed to “the eradication of antisemitism and all forms of hatred, which are the seeds of violence.”

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Other speakers at Monday’s commemorative event included the president of the 73rd session of the General Assembly of the UN, María Fernanda Espinosa; the president of AMIA, Ariel Eichbaum; and the president of the North American section of the World Jewish Congress (WJC), Evelyn Sommer.

85 candles were lit during the ceremony in commemoration of each of the AMIA victims.

Faurie indicated that Argentina would be stepping up its efforts to secure convictions of the Iranian and Hezbollah agents accused of planning the AMIA attack. In 2007, the global law enforcement agency Interpol issued six “red notices,” a form of international arrest warrant, for the wanted men — itself the result of a sustained investigation by the late Argentine federal prosecutor Alberto Nisman.

Nisman was assassinated in January 2015 as he was about to reveal the collusion between the Tehran regime and the former government of President Cristina Kirchner to cover up Iranian responsibility for the AMIA attack.

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